Home | Login | Contact

Who    What    Why



COMMUNITY UPDATE

Criticaleye's Community Updates are read each week by Members, registered users, and subscribers globally. Click on any of the topics below to see the corresponding newsletter. If you would like to comment further on any of these topics, write to us via info@criticaleye.com.




Growth in 2010 - Criticaleye Community Update 29 April 2010

The recession has no doubt left marks on leaders. These scars are leaving CEOs cautious about instigating growth strategies. Some organisations are taking a slower approach than may have been done before. Top tips for creating an effective growth strategy: • Define what growth looks like for your business - every organisation is different so there's no one-size-fits-all approach to expanding it. Targets for growth need to be specific to your organisation and grounded in what your existing business is, who the competitors are, what the market is doing, what resources you have and who the target audience is - to name just a few factors! (read more)

When strategies fail - Criticaleye Community Update 21 April 2010

Failure is never easy to admit, especially for a business and its leader. Although many would try to sugar coat it, the immense amount of business failures throughout the past two years, have not only been due to the financial crisis, but also to the lack of the cohesive organisational strategies and missteps in their implementation by leaders. (read more)

Sustainability vs. Economic Growth - Criticaleye Community Update 14 April 2010

Late last month US President Barack Obama announced a plan to begin offshore drilling, putting natural gas and oil platforms in the waters along the southern Atlantic, the eastern Gulf of Mexico and Alaska. He cites the need for short-term economic growth for agreeing to the plans. (read more)

Public Private Partnerships - Criticaleye Community Update 7 April 2010

The campaign is officially underway, the results of the May 6th UK general election will dictate what kind of Britain will emerge from the recession. If predictions are to be believed, public spending will be drastically decreased, leaving public services seeking solutions on how to continue offering these services. Will this mean more involvement from the private sector? Or will service providers be able to make genuine improvements in services and provide cost-efficiencies? (read more)